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8 Definitions

Page history last edited by rmolesh 9 years, 8 months ago

  

Home  |Participants| Page 1: CognitivePage 2: Affective |  Page 3: Theory Page 4: Diverse Learner Backgrounds: Academic|  Page 5: Diverse Learner Backgrounds: Personal and Social Page 6: Diverse Learning Styles |  7: Application and Technology | 8. Definitions

 

 

 

1. Affective Domain:  As according to Bloom, the affective domain refers to the domain of Bloom's taxonomy of knowledge referring to the range of ways in which learners respond to learning tasks dealing with values and emotions: ranging from elementary tasks of responding to emotions and values to advanced functions of being able to clarify one's own values and internalize values.   Moreover, from the perspective of curriculum, the affective domain can refer to elements within the classroom that affect learners' comfort level, emotions, and process of identification of values.

2. Bloom's Taxonomy of Knowledge:   A ordering of different types of knowledge and skills from rote memorization to more advanced skills such as analysis, synthesis, and production of independent ideas.  This taxonomy was designed in part to encourage teachers to utilize standards that encourage more of these higher-order learning tasks.

3. Cognitive Domain:  As according to Bloom, the cognitive domain, which is more well-known compared to the affective domain, refers to the domain of Bloom's taxonomy of knowledge referring to a range of tasks requiring different degrees of cognitive engagement: ranging from elementary tasks of rote memorization skills to analysis and production of new ideas.   Moreover, from the perspective of curriculum, the cogntive  domain can refer to elements within the classroom that encourage student cognitive processing (cognitive strategies)

4. Cognitive Strategies: cognitive strategies encourage efficacy of student learning processes.  Strategies may include tactics of mnemonic devices, elaborative rehearsal, self-questioning, as well as use of graphic webs.

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